Nursing Students Speak Out!

Nursing Students across Pennsylvania share their heart-warming stories about why they chose to go into nursing. Read their stories and you, too, may find that nursing is the right career choice for you!

 

 

Jessica Bartus
Sewickley Valley Hospital

Tonya R. Harris
Roxborough Memorial Hospital, Philadelphia

Melanie Heembrock
University of Scranton

Pamela Johnson
Cedar Crest College, Allentown

Tiffany Martin
The Reading Hospital School of Nursing

Gayle Matthews
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

Larissa McNeill
East Stroudsburg University
 

Patricia Murray
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

Laura Stewart
Jameson Memorial Hospital, New Castle

Angela Stizza
St. Francis Hospital, New Castle

 

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Jessica Bartus
Sewickley Valley Hospital

If I had to do it all over again, I would still be a nurse because...nursing is more than “something I do,” it is who I am.

Nursing makes up a very large part of my heart and soul. It is where I find a home and a sense of completeness. However, I didn't always feel this way.

After completing two years of a four-year nursing program, a rumor was circulating that the program was going to be dropped from the college. At that point, I was going to change my major. I had heard from professors and fellow students that I didn’t have “what it took” to be a nurse. I wasn’t feeling very confident in myself, or competent as a future nurse, so the prospect of losing the program didn't matter to me very much. I had figured that I would use my love and desire to help people in another area and possibly continue with nursing down the line.

That summer, I was working as a nurse’s aide at the local hospital putting what knowledge I had about nursing to use. Toward the middle of the summer, a dying patient came to my unit. I was informed that she didn't have much time left on this earth, and we were going to help her die comfortably.

Not long after her admission, she was moved to a private room, and cots were brought in for her family members. I spent quite a bit of time with this patient and her family, talking to them, and getting to know them better. Slowly, the patient slipped into unconsciousness and was put on a morphine drip, but I would still visit and offer support. I knew that I couldn't save this woman. I knew, however, that I could wipe her face, turn and reposition her, and talk to her as if she were sitting in front of me talking back instead of a dying person who was barely breathing four times a minute. I took her family coffee, or ice water, or just poked my head in to say hello and see how they were doing.

By now, the family had taken to calling me “Sunshine.” They said it was because I could always brighten their day and make them smile. They told me that I was making this difficult time a little bit easier for them. I wasn't at work when my patient died, but I was when her family came in to thank the staff. I asked them when and where the viewing would be held. They told me and gave me the directions. So, I drove out to the funeral home, only after I stopped at Eat 'N Park to buy a box of Smiley cookies.

When I got to the funeral home, the whole family greeted me with “Sunshine!” and big hugs. I gave them the cookies and told them that, for the rest of my life, that is how I would remember their mother—a happy woman who smiled at life and loved her family.

When I was getting ready to leave, a girl came up to me and asked if I was “Sunshine.” I smiled and said, “yes.” She looked in my eyes and told me she owed me a thank you. I asked why and she told me she lived in California and couldn't make it across the country in time to be with her grandmother.

But, the family had called and told her that I took wonderful care of her grandmother. She hugged me with tears in her eyes. At that moment, I knew that there was nothing else in the world I wanted more than to be a nurse. I knew that my heart was completely devoted to the profession, and doing anything else would be lying to myself. So, I transferred into Sewickley Valley Hospital School of Nursing. Now as graduation draws closer, I realize more everyday, that despite the substantial paperwork, late nights, and early mornings I am where I should be.
 
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Tonya R. Harris
Roxborough Memorial Hospital, Philadelphia

I chose to be a nurse because…eleven years ago when I was diagnosed with breast cancer it was very devastating.

One reason being that I already had a heart attack ten years earlier and another, cancer did not run in my family. Besides that I was only 32 years of age. I fought this dreadful disease for two very long years with several treatments of chemo and radiation. I had a very supportive, caring family, who never left my side threw it all. But what remains in my mind is the care that I received from a nurse.

I remember one day feeling really depressed. I felt like a cancer patient, I looked like a cancer patient, and then reality hit and I realized that I was a cancer patient. I was really feeling it. My room was filled with family members, there was all kind of chatter going on, the television was going, and my sister and my husband were having a discussion about whose turn it was to spend the night with me. There I was lying in the mist of all of this, and no one was paying any attention to me. Then my mother looked at me and asked what was wrong? I looked at her and said, “I want everybody to leave.” My husband asked me what I said, and I repeated it, “I want everybody to leave now.” The room got quiet for a moment, then everyone left. I turned the television off and just lay there quietly. About five minutes passed and in walked the nurse that was caring for me that day. She came in and just stood in front of me just looking at me. I looked back at her. We were looking at each other directly in the eyes, saying nothing. I don’t know how long we looked at each other, but the next thing that I remember is that we were sitting on my bed hugging each other and crying our eyes out. I know that I was really crying hysterically because reality had set in. This nurse cried with me, hugged me, wiped my tears away, cleaned me up, asked how I felt, listened to me, listened to my anger that was within me, and cared for me. This nurse felt how I was feeling, and she knew that I didn’t want to be alone but what she did know was that I was hurting inside. This nurse took time out for me. She was very compassionate, self-giving, and understanding. I remember that for the remaining time that I was in the hospital, she would always come by my room, stick her head in the door and smile at me, and give me the thumbs up sign even if I was not her patient for the day. We never talked about our cry, but I knew that if I needed to cry again that she would have been there for me.

I had wanted to become a nurse for quite some time but I was dragging my feet about it because I was afraid of taking tests, and then I got sick. But after experiencing what I did with this nurse, it made me make up my mind. I knew that I was going to nursing school after my battle with cancer, even if I died along the way. I was going to nursing school because I wanted to care for people just like she did. Yes, we all know that our family cares about us and what happens to us, but when a person that you don’t even know cares about you, it means much more.

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Melanie Heembrock
University of Scranton

I choose to be a nurse because…nursing chose me.

I honestly cannot say I had anything to do with the idea. The choice to be a nurse, oddly enough, was a recommendation by my high school guidance counselor.

I wandered into his office one day, lost as ever, trying to plan my future. He asked me what my interests were and my only reply was that I wanted to choose a career in which I could help people. “Have you ever considered being a nurse?” This question was a silent epiphany that has since changed my life.

Up until that point I hadn’t ever considered being a nurse. I knew the characteristics of the job I wanted to have: flexible, not a desk job, busy, requires skill and hard work, challenging, rewarding, allows for self improvement and personal growth. These were the qualities I wanted my future career to have. But, the number one thing I knew that I had to do with my life was help others in need. I just had to find the job that had all those characteristics. Nursing was the perfect choice for me.

And the decision to choose nursing seems more and more right every day, as I sponge bathe a grateful woman after her surgery, or help an elderly man walk down the hall. These seemingly simple tasks make a big difference and I am grateful to be able to provide those skills to those who really need me.

But it hasn’t always been easy. Not everyone who has needed my help has wanted my help. These challenging experiences have only changed my approach and not my attitude toward nursing. I know that nursing, especially now, is very challenging and oftentimes, frustrating. But, these instances have only made me more determined and passionate about my profession.

You ask me why I chose nursing? For me it wasn’t a conscious choice. Nursing was an idea from a high school guidance counselor that made me realize my dream.

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Pamela Johnson
Cedar Crest College, Allentown

I choose to be a Nurse because…

It was the end of September and my first rotation back after the long summer. With a breath of fresh air and two months of relaxation under my belt, I was prepared to begin my senior year as a nursing student. I was scheduled to do my pediatric clinical rotation first. I remember it as if it was yesterday. It was my third time on the pediatric unit of the local hospital. I had become comfortable and familiar with the atmosphere and the staff. I prepared the night before and found out that I would be caring for a 14-month-old toddler who had surgery that day for a cleft palate and lip repair. I gathered my information and introduced myself to the family, informing them that I would be looking after their son, Happy, the following day. Since it was his third surgical procedure for the cleft palate and lip, I was sure that the parents were familiar with the proceedings and the hospital atmosphere.

After getting a report from the night nurse about Happy’s condition, I proceeded to enter his room. As I walked in, I looked around and it was just as I had figured. Happy’s mother was lying flat in the reclining chair next to his crib and Happy’s father was sprawled out on the couch on the other side of the room. And then there was Happy. He was sitting in the corner of his crib, not crying, not upset, just staring back at me with big blue eyes. I smiled and started walking towards him, fixing the sheet covering his mom as I maneuvered. He looked so sweet, even with dried blood all over his chin and nose. I whispered to him and gently stroked his little fingers that were holding on tight to the bars of his crib. I giggled as I noticed that he had wiggled his way out of one arm restraint and the other one was down around his wrist. I softly cooed to him and then promised that I would return shortly with a wet cloth to clean him up. As I turned to walk away and leave, he still didn’t cry or even make a sound; it was almost like he knew and understood everything that was happening.

As I had promised, I returned shortly after with a wet cloth to clean him up. As I unhooked the crib bars to let them come down, they creaked; therefore, awaking both parents. They were glad to see me and welcomed me into the health care of their child. I briefly talked to them and reviewed how the night had gone and if they had any concerns about anything. I then suggested that I would stay with Happy if they wanted to go down to the cafeteria and grab some breakfast for themselves and stretch their legs. They said they would love that since they hadn’t been able to get out together since early yesterday.

While they were gone, I was able to get Happy ready for a bath. I gathered a cute t-shirt with puppy dogs on it and I picked up two Barney movies in the playroom. When I got back to the room, I popped in a video and watched it with him while cleaning him up for his parents’ return. They were so excited when they returned. Just as I had promised, I was sitting in the chair with Happy on my lap, watching Barney.

Later that day, I took Happy on several walks through the hall in a wagon. He loved it; in fact, he loved it so much that he didn’t ever want to get out. Happy also wouldn’t drink out of his special bottle so we were worried about hydration status. I then proceeded down to the cafeteria to find a special spoon for him to eat water ice with to get some fluid in him.

All in all, the day was a great success. By the end of the day, I knew that I had done as much as possible for this family in the few hours I was there. I didn’t know how much I had affected that family until I went in to say my good-byes to them. I shook their hands and informed them on how great it was to have the chance to work with their son. That is when it happened—the recognition that I needed to prove to myself that I was doing a good job. The mother turned to me and said, “You will be here again tomorrow to take care of him, right?” I silently said yes in my head. I had done it. This mother entrusted me with her son. She had faith that I could take care of her child safely. She not only provided me with confidence and a great story to tell others, but she gave me more nursing spirit to continue on with a dream that I have long had…the dream to pursue pediatric nursing. 

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Tiffany Martin
The Reading Hospital School of Nursing

I choose to be a nurse because... 

It was an average evening at the Martin House, and the family was gathered at the table for dinner. The phone rang and my father answered it. He said, “Hello.” I listened and I watched the color of his rosy cheeks draw from his face. His usual friendly tone had vanished like a black cat into the night. I examined him closely as his eyes drew up, and then again back down. He shook his head, and muttered a word or two as he hung up the phone. He said, “There has been a mistake.” He removed himself from the dinner table and put on his coat and hat. The family abruptly gathered their belongings and rushed to the hospital.

Upon arrival, we were informed that there had been a problem with the heart bypass performed on my grandmother. She was in a coma, and we were told to expect the worst. I remember the dusky, chilled room as if I were presently there. As I stood breathless at the foot of her bed, I observed her lethargic, defenseless, almost lifeless body. Her hands were edematous and cold to the touch. She was on a respirator and only breathing 10 percent on her own. Her pulse was weak, slow, and thready. All I could think of was how much I hated what had happened and the pain it was causing my family.

I am the strong, well-disposed person in my family. I felt responsible to hold everyone together in this time of desperation and hopelessness. Instead of grieving, I held my grandmother’s hand and told her that I was there for her and I loved her. I stayed by her side and fixed her hair and washed the dried blood from her face. I sat in her room all night talking to her about anything and everything. I wanted her to hear my voice and know that she wasn’t going through this tragedy alone. This is when I felt my first instincts to be a nurse.

The nursing staff was absolutely phenomenal and supportive in our time of need. They had answered so many questions and did everything possible for my grandmother. The nurses made my grandmother look at ease and called a chaplain to visit and offer prayers. They checked on her frequently and turned and positioned her. The nurses explained to my family how to read the monitors that my grandmother was on and the action of the medications administered. Our family was even given a number to call about her condition at any time.

Jim, her nurse, was incredibly empathetic. He made my grandmother look so comfortable and sound. While speaking to my grandmother, Jim noticed her heart rate had peaked, and my grandmother would breathe 20 percent on her own. After our visit that evening, the staff suggested we return early the next morning since she had such a response to our verbal stimulation.

First thing the next morning, we did indeed return to the hospital. Within one hour of our visit, my grandmother arose from her coma. Not only was she in good condition, but she remembered everything we had said while she was intubated. My grandmother is currently 83 years old, and has fully recovered from the event. In fact, our family jokes about the various things she remembered us conversing about in the hospital.

I am so grateful to have my grandmother today. That experience made me realize what a difference I can reflect on someone else’s life. I was so inspired by the nursing staff at the hospital. My grandmother received only the finest care and my family was given extraordinary emotional support during her stay. After that eventful day, I knew that being a nurse is what I was meant to do. From watching Jim care for my grandmother and my experiences as a nursing student, I have learned that nothing is more rewarding than aiding others, particularly when they need you the most. I was inspired to be a nurse through that difficult yet rewarding experience with my grandmother. I hope that one day I am able to touch someone the way that I was touched by Jim.

Now that I have fully grasped the opportunity to make a difference in someone’s life, I wouldn’t give it up for the world! I love to spend my day caring, educating, and supporting patients and their loved ones in their time of need! My passion for nursing cannot be touched by words, but seen in the twinkle of my eye and the smile on my face when with my patients. I may not be some rich and famous movie star, but feel like I am ... every day!

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Gayle Matthews
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

I remember that I was wearing overalls and a blue velour shirt. It was the middle of the week, early April. I was eating a pretzel, hurrying, on my way to my Wednesday night photography class. I was just stopping by the hospice to say hello, like so many other afternoons. I had no idea what I was about to encounter.

Veda had been moved out of her apartment and into the hospital, and from the hospital into an AIDS hospice. Although I had only known her for a few months, I saw her almost every day. I was her Buddy, part of a program that matched volunteers with AIDS patients in the community. Veda was my second buddy, and I only knew her in the final, acute phase of her illness. Her story was not a happy one; she had contracted AIDS and become pregnant while still in high school. By the time I knew her, she was 21-years-old and gravely ill, and she had already buried her infant son.

Veda had been coughing up yellow phlegm for weeks, so when she started coughing that night, I simply reached for the pan for her to spit in. We were both sitting on her bed watching Rosie O’Donnell on TV. She spit, but instead of yellow-green mucous, a lump of dark purple matter oozed from her lips to the tray. It didn’t stop— I kept wiping the blood from her mouth and it was gooey and thick and hard to get away from her face neatly and there was no easy way to keep her from seeing it. It was like something from a horror movie; she was gurgling and pushing the blood between her lips and it didn’t smell right and everything was happening too fast.

I must have pushed the call button, because suddenly there were four nurses in the room and someone helped me out of my long-sleeved shirt and into a gown and two pairs of gloves and goggles. I went back to my place next to Veda’s head, feeling sorry that everyone around her was dressed in space suits. But then I was busy wiping her chin, talking to her, trying to soothe her. I tried to stay calm, but my own fear was probably showing on my face. Terrified, Veda clung to me and cried. She flailed, tried to lift herself out of the bed, grabbed at me, and at the air. She was not ready to die.

After a long while, she collapsed, and her head lay on my hand. For several long moments she was quiet, and I thought maybe she had fallen asleep. I gradually realized that the pulse I felt in my fingers was my own; Veda’s heart had stopped beating. Slowly we began to move again. The nurses and I took off our goggles and threw away our gowns. I closed Veda’s eyes. Someone removed her oxygen and turned off the pump, and the room seemed very quiet.

Her mother arrived. The emotional pitch of the room rose again, as she cried and cursed the fact that she had missed her final chance to say good-bye to her only daughter. She asked me to wipe the blood off of Veda’s teeth, which I did, and then I left them alone.

That was the hardest night of my life. My heart had been breaking incrementally for Veda for weeks. The night before she died, she placed my hand on her heart and fell asleep. She was so thin, and shaky, and scared. After she died, I recall wandering around, not sure of what to do with myself, feeling like my chest had been cracked open with a baseball bat. Confronted by loss, and grief, but also by Veda’s strength and courage, I found my thoughts swirling, my world spinning, as I struggled to fill the concavity in my own chest with some kind of balance and calm. I was astonished by her death, and startled by the fact that it didn’t fit into any emotional category I had ever used before.

I am stronger for having known Veda. From her, I learned about death, and about life, and about myself and my life. The night she died was the first time anyone ever told me that I would make a great nurse. As I prepared to pack up and embark on my biggest adventure—becoming a Peace Corps Volunteer— I wondered what Veda’s death and that career prediction would mean in my life. From across two years and the Atlantic Ocean, I think I finally understand. I am good at caring, and care giving. I would make a great nurse.

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Larissa McNeill
East Stroudsburg University
 

I Choose to be a nurse because…

 

As a student in high school many, many years ago I had a strong interest in the sciences and contemplated starting my collegiate career as a pre-med. major. I ended up taking a basic science route and I am extremely content that I did. After a few semesters I dropped out of college and went to Emmaus Road Ministry school and received my degree in Missions. I traveled the previous summer to various eastern European countries and thought that my “calling” would be to help others in disadvantaged countries. As I continued to mature, marry, and have children, I felt that I needed to back up my love and compassion for people with a skill that I could offer them. More than just hope, I could help give them life.

The confirmation came when my first daughter was born with a congenital heart defect, which took me through an emotional journey that I did not know the outcome. My baby daughter eventually required open-heart surgery to correct her deformity. THIS is when I realized what nursing was all about. The nurses in the PICU not only cared for my little angel, but they cared and took care of me also. Many nights the staff would come in and we would talk about things from chest tubes to what was on TV. This is a precious memory that I am sharing. One night in the hospital, when I couldn’t find a comb to fix my daughters hair, the entire PICU was on the search. They only came up with a plastic fork, but at three in the morning we all combed her hair with a plastic fork. I needed my little angel to have nice combed hair no matter what her medical condition. The nurses understood and went beyond the call of duty to help me feel secure. They made such an impact on my life, that I will never be able to thank them enough for helping me through such a tough time.

My daughter is now fine and the tragic event seems far-gone, but the lasting impression and genuine concern from the PICU nurses will never be forgotten. I want to pass on the gift of compassionate nursing to others, just as it was given to me. I love people, ALL people. My heart is still with children and the remarkable way that their little bodies recover from devastating situations. I want to be that nurse that not only is skilled in lifesaving techniques but also the one who helps families as a whole unit. THIS is why I chose nursing. It has taken me quite a few years to get here, but I feel that nothing can hold me back.

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Patricia Murray
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

July 2, 1992—I dribble down the congested basketball court when suddenly, a ferocious defender appears before me and steals the ball. I sprint in hopes of escaping my loss and regaining possession, but sadly fail.

The room is dark when I walk in. Anxiety creeps into my heart as my worst fear stares me in the face. I watch helplessly as my father is taken away. Brain cancer has conquered my father after a grueling four-year struggle. On July 2, 1992, one person whom I loved dearly was swept away as swiftly as a defender steals a basketball, taking all control out of my hands. At a young age, I was faced with the harsh reality of death. Such an experience without a doubt influenced my life course. When deciding what to study in college, my mind traveled back ten years to where I stood powerless next to my father’s bed. After witnessing the deterioration caused by cancer, I realize I wish to ameliorate the anguish of others as a compensation for the suffering of my father. Poet, John Homer Miller wrote, “Circumstances and situations do color life, but you have been given the mind to choose what the colors shall be.” I cannot take back the death of my father, but by pursuing a career in nursing, I will have the chance to brilliantly “color” the lives of others as a therapy for dealing with my loss and as a contribution to the field of medicine.

My father’s battle between life and death lasted for four years. In the last months of his life several home nurses attended to him each day. It was their love and dedication that helped keep him alive for an extended period of time. Not only did the nurses look after my father, but also they acted as a support group for my mother, seven older siblings, and me. I hope I will have the chance to emulate the compassion and professionalism that these nurses exhibited. My father always used to say to me, “whatever it takes.” This simple, yet powerful advice taught me to be resourceful in my studies, life experiences, and athletics. As I continue my study of nursing, I plan to adhere to his words of wisdom. I am willing to do “whatever it takes” to accomplish my goal of becoming a devoted health care professional.

With each patient I assist, I will be closer to regaining possession of the ball. I will dribble confidently, weaving through my defenders. I will go up for the shot and score.

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Laura Stewart
Jameson Memorial Hospital, New Castle

I choose to be a nurse because…to me there is not a more noble profession.

There are few other career choices that allow one to have such an impact on a person’s life. While other health care workers have limited contact with patients, nurses are there around the clock to provide care. What a unique experience it is that a patient allows a total stranger the privilege of providing care to them. They allow us to take part in wonderful events such as the birth of a child but also allow us to comfort them when they lose a loved one. They entrust their lives to us and it is our responsibility to provide the highest level of care. We as nurses are in a position to truly be a part of miracles.

I have been a Licensed Practical Nurse for 11 years but returned to school so that I may become a Registered Nurse. Eight years ago, I was blessed to have a special patient come into my life. I work in a nursing home and one day we admitted a 26-year-old woman with a primary diagnosis of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. She also had several malignant tumors on her lungs as well as several suspicious ‘spots’ on her liver along with ascites and presence of g-tube, tracheostomy, and ventilator dependence. Upon admission, we were informed that she was terminal and chances were that she would not last through the month. This woman had a husband, a six-year-old daughter and a four-month-old son. She had spent the last two months in the hospital and had had limited contact with her children. She was not even able to converse with her daughter on the phone because of her tracheostomy. That first day she presented as pleasant but very weak and sullen. Our team of professionals met and developed a plan of care that would allow her to maximize her potential while maintaining her dignity. The first major stride forward came when our Respiratory Therapist along with the help of our Speech Therapist was able to initiate a Passy-Muir speaking valve. The memory of her little girl sitting on her bed and hugging her when she spoke her first words in months brings a smile to my face to this day. The months passed and she grew stronger. We eventually were able to successfully wean her from the ventilator and extubate her. A modified barium swallow showed no signs of aspiration and we initiated feedings with the eventual removal of the g-tube. The entire staff marveled at the progress this woman had made. She was scheduled for an appointment with her oncologist and the follow-up reports confirmed that the tumors in her lungs and the spots on her liver were gone. What other explanation is there but divine intervention. Approximately nine months after her admission she was discharged to home. She came to visit us several times after her discharge but eventually the visits ceased. Many times through the years I have thought about her and wondered how she is doing. I can only trust that she and her family are happy and healthy.

If I were not a nurse, I would not have had the opportunity to meet this woman and have pleasure of her life touching mine in a way that I will remember for always. Nursing gave me the ability to take an intimate part in this true “miracle.” This is only one patient’s story, one that made me so aware of the strength of the human spirit and of the will to live when it appears that there is no hope. I have been blessed to have eleven years of experiences that have brought me so much laughter and joy as well as some tears. I am proud to be a Licensed Practical Nurse and look forward to my career as a Registered Nurse.

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Angela Stizza
St. Francis Hospital, New Castle

I choose to be a nurse because... I believe we all have a purpose and a
calling and that this is mine.

My God has called me to serve in this way during my time on Earth to show his love through the work of my hands. Through my work I want to show people of all ages, races, and backgrounds caring, concern, and compassion. I offer the following prayer when I talk to my Higher Power and that he will give me the strength to be the best nurse I can possibly be.

I pray, God, that you will make me more like you, to have compassion, understanding, love, knowledge and the skills to help all that come my way. Guide my hands as I touch the lives of others in anyway that I am able. My ultimate goal is for my work to be pleasing in your sight and
for them to see you through me.

Because all who come my way are individuals and not a routine who deserve and need care customized to their needs. They all need various touches from you. 

Because a woman's labor pains are too strong for her to bear on her own, I will be there with her.

Help me to give her your touch of strength and encouragement. 

Because the broken spirits of a family who lost a loved one needs my counseling and sympathy.

Help me to give them your touch of comfort.

Because the premature newborns need me to keep them warm and hold them close.

Help me to give them your touch of nurturing.

Because the frightened and dying need my hand to hold. Help me to give them your touch of peace and rest.

Because the woman that learns her breast cancer has returned needs my support.

Help me to give her your silence so I can listen to her feelings and frustrations.

Because the violated, abused children need me to speak for them. Help me to give them your touch of protection.

Because the schizophrenic or depressed one feel alone and misunderstood. Help me to give them your touch of safety and trust. Because all human beings are special, unique, and made by your hand.

Because everyone deserves to feel non-judged, loved, and valuable.

Because if I can help just one single soul I will rest in peace at the end of my journey.
 

 -Amen 

That is why I want to be a nurse. There are so many lives to make a difference in and so little time we spend here.

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